Beth Cavener, Spirit Animals

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Beth Cavener‘s sculpture, “Forgiveness”

Artists often integrate their work into their life. This can range in extremity, as Maria Abromavic seeks to do in her meditations and performance art; her work requires incredible preparation and strength of will. Others seek to integrate their life lessons and spirituality into their work. Beth Cavener believes that within each of us, there resides animal instincts and primitive roots.

How do you integrate life and art? Show us by submitting to our Spring Edition of Fiant Verbas.

The Curious Codex

While our editor attended graduate school at School of the Art Institute of Chicago (SAIC), she got a chance to view an early edition of Codex Seraphinianus in their special collection archives. Italian artist, Luigi Serafini, has created an illustrated Encyclopedia for an imaginary world, complete with an imaginary language. We’re certain that the world has never seen anything quite like it.

Read more in an interview with Wired & Serafini.

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The book serves as living proof that you–the artist, the writer, the creator–can assemble an appendix of things, things that do not have to correspond directly to what you see around you. Feel free to explore the uncharted territory of your mind!

Make sure to submit to our Spring Edition of Fiant Verbas!

Reminder: Submissions Now being Accepted

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We are now accepting submissions for the Spring 2017 Edition: the theme is Integrate.

Integration can encompass a wide variety of things. It can relate to social, racial, or religious movements. It can explain a combination of forms: artistic, for example. It is not without tension, without movement, and is a tool that carries its weight in history. The Oxford English Dictionaries defines the term loosely as “Combine (one thing) with another to form a whole.”

The deadline for submission is April 15th, 2017.

Guidelines:

  • We accept submissions of various genres including (but not limited to): poetry, fiction, non-fiction (reviews, politics, op-ed), theater, audio/visual, photography, and painting.
  • No submission may exceed 10 pages in length.
  • Poets: please submit no more than five poems at a time.
  • Excerpts from bigger pieces are accepted.
  • If you wish to submit something, but are unsure of how to (such as dance, performance, etc.), contact us!
  • No fee for submission at this time.
  • Send all work via email to maggiehellwig@gmail.com

Sally Mann, American Photographer

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From What Remains, Sally Mann

If you’re interested in American Photography, Sally Mann is one of the most notable (mainstream) american photographers of our time. You may be familiar with much of her work without even being aware. Her topics range from “mythical” aspects of every day life, to landscape, to small extraordinary shapes.

While much of her work appears to be heavily photo shopped, she is educated in methods of chemical alteration during the photograph development process, and often uses very old equipment to take her photos. To learn some more, visit Art 21‘s website for one of their first features:

Art 21’s feature on “place,” with Sally Mann

 

Calming & Empowering Mad Libs

I found myself creatively stunted last night when I came across an infuriating post on Fox News, so I created a mantra. Then, I decided that other people might want to do this…and they might want to be silly about it (laughter is good medicine after all)…so I turned my mantra into nonspecific Mad Libs. It’s to be used whenever you get overwhelmed, angry, or are faced with confrontation, and you can use it however you like.

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MOMA’s Response

(In case you missed it…)

The MOMA (Museum of Modern Art) in NYC has installed artwork from banned Muslim countries, in response to Trump’s Executive travel order.

Read the article in ARTnews:

“In Elegant Riposte to Trump’s Travel Order, MOMA Installs Works by Artists from Banned Muslim Countries.”

Reborn Sounds of Childhood Dreams I 1961-5 by Ibrahim El-Salahi born 1930
Reborn Sounds of Childhood Dreams I, by Ibrahim El-Salahi

Art is Power

During the Superbowl last night, a friend of ours stumbled across this article in the New York Times:

“Scott Pruitt is Seen Cutting the E.P.A. With a Scalpel, Not a Clever”

It is indeed a desperate state of affairs when Scientific studies, which provide sufficient evidence for climate change, are being denied.

“…But in Mr. Pruitt, who is expected to be confirmed by the Senate this week, the president has tapped a surgeon, not a butcher, to fulfill those pledges. As much as anyone, Mr. Pruitt knows the legal intricacies of environmental regulation — and deregulation. As Oklahoma’s attorney general for the last six years, he has led or taken part in 14 lawsuits against the E.P.A.

His changes may not have the dramatic flair favored by Mr. Trump, but they could weaken the agency’s authority even long after Mr. Trump has left office.”

Whether or not you voted, or voted for Trump, Hilary, or even Jill…this news must make you feel something. It affects all of us, and the legislation that is to come will have impacts on our daily lives well into the future (not to mention huge ramifications on a global scale). Take some time to consider our theme for the next edition; take some time to consider the current state of affairs in which you–wherever you live–find yourself.

Art is power. Let’s make some.

Poetry Fuel

 

Those Winter Sundays by Robert Hayden

 

Sundays too my father got up early

and put his clothes on in the blueblack cold,

then with cracked hands that ached

from labor in the weekday weather made

banked fires blaze. No one every thanked him.

 

I’d wake and hear the cold splintering, breaking.

When the rooms were warm, he’d call,

and slowly I would rise and dress,

fearing the chronic angers of that house,

 

Speaking indifferently to him,

who had driven out the cold

and polished my good shoes as well.

What did I know, what did I know

of love’s austere and lonely offices?