Margaret Atwood’s Two Cents on The Handmaid’s Tale

At the dawn of the Hulu series adaptation of The Handmaid’s Tale, Margaret Atwood shares her thoughts. What does the book mean for us? What was it intended for? For whom was it intended?

“Why do we never learn the real name of the central character, I have often been asked. Because, I reply, so many people throughout history have had their names changed, or have simply disappeared from view…

handmaid's tale

Offred records her story as best she can; then she hides it, trusting that it may be discovered later, by someone who is free to understand it and share it. This is an act of hope: Every recorded story implies a future reader. Robinson Crusoe keeps a journal. So did Samuel Pepys, in which he chronicled the Great Fire of London. So did many who lived during the Black Death, although their accounts often stop abruptly. So did Roméo Dallaire, who chronicled both the Rwandan genocide and the world’s indifference to it. So did Anne Frank, hidden in her secret annex.”

To read the article in full, click here: “Margaret Atwood on What ‘The Handmaid’s Tale’ Means in the Age of Trump.”

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The Curious Codex

While our editor attended graduate school at School of the Art Institute of Chicago (SAIC), she got a chance to view an early edition of Codex Seraphinianus in their special collection archives. Italian artist, Luigi Serafini, has created an illustrated Encyclopedia for an imaginary world, complete with an imaginary language. We’re certain that the world has never seen anything quite like it.

Read more in an interview with Wired & Serafini.

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The book serves as living proof that you–the artist, the writer, the creator–can assemble an appendix of things, things that do not have to correspond directly to what you see around you. Feel free to explore the uncharted territory of your mind!

Make sure to submit to our Spring Edition of Fiant Verbas!

Reminder: Submissions Now being Accepted

call-for-submissions

We are now accepting submissions for the Spring 2017 Edition: the theme is Integrate.

Integration can encompass a wide variety of things. It can relate to social, racial, or religious movements. It can explain a combination of forms: artistic, for example. It is not without tension, without movement, and is a tool that carries its weight in history. The Oxford English Dictionaries defines the term loosely as “Combine (one thing) with another to form a whole.”

The deadline for submission is April 15th, 2017.

Guidelines:

  • We accept submissions of various genres including (but not limited to): poetry, fiction, non-fiction (reviews, politics, op-ed), theater, audio/visual, photography, and painting.
  • No submission may exceed 10 pages in length.
  • Poets: please submit no more than five poems at a time.
  • Excerpts from bigger pieces are accepted.
  • If you wish to submit something, but are unsure of how to (such as dance, performance, etc.), contact us!
  • No fee for submission at this time.
  • Send all work via email to maggiehellwig@gmail.com

Calming & Empowering Mad Libs

I found myself creatively stunted last night when I came across an infuriating post on Fox News, so I created a mantra. Then, I decided that other people might want to do this…and they might want to be silly about it (laughter is good medicine after all)…so I turned my mantra into nonspecific Mad Libs. It’s to be used whenever you get overwhelmed, angry, or are faced with confrontation, and you can use it however you like.

matra-mad-libs

 

First Edition: Integrate

The theme for the first, Spring edition of Fiant Verbas is Integrate.

integrate

Integration can encompass a wide variety of things. It can relate to social, racial, or religious movements. It can explain a combination of forms: artistic, for example. It is not without tension, without movement, and is a tool that carries its weight in history. The Oxford English Dictionaries defines the term loosely as “Combine (one thing) with another to form a whole.”

The deadline for submission is April 15th, 2017.

Guidelines:

  • We accept submissions of various genres including (but not limited to): poetry, fiction, non-fiction (reviews, politics, op-ed), theater, audio/visual, photography, and painting.
  • No submission may exceed 10 pages in length.
  • Poets: please submit no more than five poems at a time.
  • Excerpts from bigger pieces are accepted.
  • If you wish to submit something, but are unsure of how to (such as dance, performance, etc.), contact us!
  • No fee for submission at this time.
  • Send all work via email to maggiehellwig@gmail.com